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Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai (also referred to by the honorifics Lakhino Latif, Latif Ghot, Bhittai, and Bhitt Jo Shah) (1689 – 1752)(Sindhi: شاھ عبدالطيف ڀٽائيِ, Urdu: ,شاہ عبداللطیف بھٹائی) was a Sindhi Sufi scholar, mystic, saint, poet, and musician. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest poets of the Sindhi language. His collected poems were assembled in the compilation Shah Jo Risalo, which exists in numerous versions and has been translated to English, Urdu, and other languages. His work frequently has been compared to that of Rūmī: Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Professor of Islamic studies at George Washington University, described Shah Latif as a “direct emanation Rūmī‘s spirituality in the Indian world.”[1]

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Jaun Elia
(H/DR Adeeb Ahmed, Karachi)

Jaun Elia was born on December 14, 1931 in an illustrious family of Amroha, Uttar Pradesh. He was the youngest of his siblings. His father, Allama Shafiq Hasan Elia, was deeply involved in art and literature and also an astrologer and a poet. This literary environment modeled him along the same lines, and he wrote his first Urdu couplet when he was just 8.

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Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Balkhī (Persian: جلال‌الدین محمد بلخى), also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī (Persian: جلال‌الدین محمد رومی) and popularly known as Mevlānā in Turkey and Mawlānā[1] (Persian: مولانا, Persian pronunciation: [moulɒːnɒː]) in Iran and Afghanistan but known to the English-speaking world simply as Rumi[3] (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273) was a 13th-centuryPersian[4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11] Muslim poetjurist

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Aisha bint Abu Bakr (612 – 678) (Arabic: عائشة‎ Transliteration: ʿāʾisha, [ʕaːʔɪʃæh]) also transcribed as (A’ishah, Aisyah, Ayesha, A’isha, Aishat, Aishah, or Aisha) was one of Muhammad’s wives.[1] In Islamic writings, her name is thus often prefixed by the title “Mother of the Believers” (Arabic: أمّ المؤمنين umm-al-mu’minīn), per the description of Muhammad’s wives in the Qur’an.[2][3][4]

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Muawiyah I (Arabic: معاوية ابن أبي سفيان‎ Muʿāwiyah ibn ʾAbī Sufyān; 602 – 6 May 680) was the first Caliph of the Umayyad Dynasty. After the conquest of Mecca by the Muslims, Muawiyah’s family converted to Islam. Muawiyah is brother-in-law to Muhammad who married his sister Ramlah bint Abi-Sufyan in 1AH. Muawiyah became a scribe for Muhammad, and during the first and second caliphates of Abu Bakr and Umar, fought with the Muslims against the Byzantines in Syria.

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Yazīd ibn Mu‘āwiya ibn Abī Sufyān Arabic: يزيد بن معاوية بن أبي سفيان‎ (born 645; died 683), commonly known as Yazid I, was the second Caliph of the Umayyad Caliphate (and the first one by birthright). He ruled for three years from 680 CE until his death in 683 CE. Many Muslims condemn Yazid’s rule as contentious and unjust while a section of Muslims, mostly living in Saudi Arab, Pakistan and Egypt, in sharp defiance to Shia Muslims’ beliefs,

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InpaperMagzine Dr. Ali Madeeh Hashmi

February 17, 2011

Gulzaar-i-hast-o-bood na begaana-waar dekh (Do not observe the garden of Being unawares) — Iqbal

Faiz Ahmed Faiz was born in Sialkot a hundred years ago, with official records showing February 13, 1911 as the date of birth.

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1803-1874

Jab qata ki masafat e shab aaftaab ne
Jalwa kiya sahar ka rukhe behijaab ne

Dekha suwe falak Shahe gardoon rakaab ne

Mudh kar sada rafeeqoN ko di us janaab ne

Aakhir hai raat hamd o sanaye Khuda karo

Utho fareezaye sahri ko ada karo

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Everyone enjoys a ghazal irrespective of beliefs, writes Sonal Srivastava.

“Tum itna jo muskura rahe ho/ kya gham hai jisko chhupa rahe ho” – “You who are smiling so/ What grief is it that you are hiding?”

These famous lines are from a ghazal sung by Jagjit Singh for the movie Arth, in the early 1980s. With its soul-stirring lyrics, the filmy ghazal touched a chord with the young and old alike. It is still popular among music lovers.

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Mizra Ghalib is also known for his skill in prose. He was considered a gifted letter writer. At the time that Gahlib lived, letters were written using formal language. Mizra Ghalib came up with a style of writing that made letters speak to their recipients. He achieved this by making the letters more intimate, chatty and informal. The result was a new literary letter writing style. He himself acknowledged this in his letter to Mirza Hatim Ali Mehr.

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